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Welcome to the interactive schedule for the fall 2016 CoLED Conference.
Visit the conference website for conference details, or the interactive map for venue locations.
Ethnography and Design: Mutual Provocations is made possible through funding from the UC Office of the President, the Wenner-Gren Foundation, and participating units across University of California campuses.
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Thursday, October 27
 

2:00pm

Beachwalk
Join other conference attendees for an informal stroll along the scenic La Jolla waterfront. Hosts will provide an optional prompt for informal discussion related to the conference theme.

Hosted by Jenny Kelly.

Prompt: Description in ethnographic writing.

Meet at the deck of the Gliderport building at 2:00pm.

Speakers
avatar for Jenny Kelly

Jenny Kelly

Dept. of Communication, UCSD
I am a University of California President’s Postdoctoral Fellow for 2015-2017 in the Department of Communication at UC San Diego. My research broadly engages questions of settler colonialism, U.S. empire, and the fraught politics of both tourism and solidarity. I am currently at... Read More →


Thursday October 27, 2016 2:00pm - 4:45pm
Torrey Pines Gliderport Torrey Pines Gliderport, 2800 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive, La Jolla, CA 92037

2:00pm

Devising Scores for Ethnography
This a practical workshop for devising scores for ethnography. This workshop extends experiments from earlier CoLED workshops in bringing methods from devised improvisation of dance, theatre and performance into ethnography. Choreographer J. Burrows describes two main ways of classifying scores: The first kind is something written as a representation of the piece itself, a template which holds within the detail, in linear time, of what you will eventually see or hear. In the second kind of score, what is written or described is a tool for information, image and inspiration. It acts as a source what might happen or what might emerge, but the whose shapes may be different form the final realization.

In this ethnographic workshop we are interested in the second. One of the advantages of the score is a distraction for the performer, providing a focus away from their self-consciousness and fear. Along the way we will discover and discuss how all methods of ethnography come embedded with explicit and implicit instructions. These habitual and disciplined instructions operate like scores limiting the possible engagements with fieldwork. Designing and devising scores for ethnography will provoke innovative fieldwork in training and in practice. We will be inventing and collecting new scores.

Speakers
avatar for Duskin Drum

Duskin Drum

Ph.D. Candidate in Performance Studies, University of California, Davis
duskin drum is an artist, performer, sailor, and woodsman. At UC Davis, he is a PhD candidate in Performance Studies with emphases in performance practice-as-research, Native American Studies, and Science and Technology Studies. Currently, he is writing a dissertation about petroleum... Read More →
avatar for Joe Dumit

Joe Dumit

Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Davis
I study how science and medicine change and how the lives of Americans, including consumers, patients, doctors and scientists also change as the nature of facts and evidence change. My first book, Picturing Personhood: Brains Scans and Biomedical America (Princeton University Press... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Rebolloso McCullough

Sarah Rebolloso McCullough

Associate Director at the Feminist Research Institute, University of California, Davis
Sarah Rebolloso McCullough creates meaningful and respectful dialogue across boundaries that typically divide—between universities and communities, activists and researchers, scientists and humanists, workers and policymakers. Her book manuscript examines how sensations such... Read More →
avatar for Kevin O'Connor

Kevin O'Connor

Ph.D. Candidate in Performance Studies, University of California, Davis
Kevin O’Connor, MFA choreography is a Ph.D candidate in performance studies at UC Davis.  He is  multidisciplinary artist working as a choreographer, dancer, improviser, circus artist and installation artist.  He is involved in a decade long artistic collaboration with Ruth Douthwright... Read More →


Thursday October 27, 2016 2:00pm - 5:00pm
iHouse Great Hall Side Patio/FirePlace Circle

2:00pm

Welcome Table & Packet Pick-Up
Pick up a conference packet including a name tag, map, printed schedule, and list of nearby cafes on and off campus, ask questions about the conference schedule, or chat with one of the fabulous CoLED volunteers running the welcome table.

Make sure you register in advance to let us know your dietary and access needs, and get a pre-printed nametag with your name, affiliation, preferred pronouns.

Thursday October 27, 2016 2:00pm - 7:00pm
iHouse Great Hall Entrance Patio

3:00pm

Altered Visions: Constructing Cameras from Found Objects
Limited Capacity full
Adding this to your schedule will put you on the waitlist.

Participation in this workshop is limited. Please follow this link to register in advance:

Advance Sign-Up Here


This 90-minute workshop will allow artists and researchers to build their own pinhole cameras out of found materials while discussing photographic methods for making meaning. Various discarded objects from the UCSD campus will be collected in the days leading up to the workshop and will be available for participants to deconstruct/reconstruct in an organized, step-by-step method of instruction. People can also bring their own objects that are pertinent to specific modes of research, art practices, or otherwise. I hope to reach an assemblage of artists, educators, students, researchers, ethnographers, and the general public; individual practice and collaboration will be encouraged.

Meet at the Welcome Table on the iHouse Entrance Patio at 3pm, and embark from there.

Artists
avatar for Caity Fares

Caity Fares

Adjunct Faculty, Art Institute of California, San Diego and San Diego City College
Caity Fares is a visual artist and educator living in San Diego, California. She uses digital and analog cameras to create traditional portraits and builds handmade cameras out of discarded materials to make experimental landscapes. Caity has exhibited work in the states and abroad... Read More →


Thursday October 27, 2016 3:00pm - 4:30pm
iHouse Courtyard

3:00pm

Quiet Room
This room is provided as a quiet, safe space for all conference participants, and as an access accommodation. Please keep lighting low, all sounds off, and sensory distractions to a minimum.

All conference participants are welcome to stop into the quiet room at any time they feel the need for a quiet, peaceful space.

Please respect other conference participants using the space by not working in the quiet room.

Thursday October 27, 2016 3:00pm - 7:00pm
MCC 133

5:00pm

Conference Opening and Welcome Address
Speakers
avatar for Joseph Hankins

Joseph Hankins

Associate Professor, University of California, San Diego
Joseph Hankins received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 2009. His research focuses on the distribution of ethical, affective, and sensory obligation at the intersections of contemporary capitalism and political representation. His book, Working Skin: Making Leather... Read More →
avatar for Elana Zilberg

Elana Zilberg

Associate Professor of Communication, University of California, San Diego
My earlier work focused on security, space, and mobility between the United States and Latin America. In my book Space of Detention: The Making of a Transnational Gang Crisis between Los Angeles and San Salvador (Duke University Fall 2011), I tracked the production of transnational... Read More →


Thursday October 27, 2016 5:00pm - 5:15pm
iHouse Great Hall

5:25pm

Plenary Opening Roundtable: Design ←→ Ethnography ←→ Ethnographic Design
Keyword Panelists
  • Lucy Suchman → Design
  • George Marcus → Ethnography
  • Keith Murphy → Ethnographic Design

Moderator

Cassandra Hartblay

Moderators
avatar for Cassandra Hartblay

Cassandra Hartblay

Postdoctoral Scholar with the Collaboratory for Ethnographic Design (CoLED), University of California, San Diego
Cassandra Hartblay is a cultural and medical anthropologist, social theorist, and multimedia storyteller. Her work focuses on Russia and the Russian-speaking former Soviet Union. Dr. Hartblay's approach to theory is informed by global justice movements and medical anthropology especially... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for George Marcus

George Marcus

Chancellor’s Professor and Chair of Anthropology Department, University of California, Irvine
avatar for Keith Murphy

Keith Murphy

Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Irvine
I’m a linguistic and sociocultural anthropologist, and a fair amount of my work explores the relationship between language, material culture, and human experience. For a long time now I’ve been interested in the social, political, and cultural sides of design and designing... Read More →
avatar for Lucy Suchman

Lucy Suchman

Chair in the Anthropology of Science and Technology in the Department of Sociology, Lancaster University
Lucy Suchman has engaged for over 30 years in research at the interface of humans and machines, with a particular focus on initiatives in the delegation of human capabilities to technological systems. Before taking up her present post she was a Principal Scientist at Xerox’s... Read More →


Thursday October 27, 2016 5:25pm - 6:15pm
iHouse Great Hall

6:15pm

6:15pm

Ethnography and the Arts: Reports from the mediated field
This pop-up exhibition, curated by Yelena Gluzman, presents ethnographic projects that engage deeply with arts practices. By working with ideas and techniques from sculpture, performance, sound composition, experimental film and video, and photography, these ethnographic projects explore possibilities for reflexive, speculative, activist, collaborative and community-based ethnography.

Artists
avatar for Caity Fares

Caity Fares

Adjunct Faculty, Art Institute of California, San Diego and San Diego City College
Caity Fares is a visual artist and educator living in San Diego, California. She uses digital and analog cameras to create traditional portraits and builds handmade cameras out of discarded materials to make experimental landscapes. Caity has exhibited work in the states and abroad... Read More →
avatar for Christian Doll

Christian Doll

Ph.D. Candidate in Anthropology, University of California, Davis
My research analyzes state-making and futurity in South Sudan by looking at official projects and everyday activities in South Sudan's capital city, Juba. I have conducted fieldwork in South Sudan since 2012 and am currently writing my dissertation. I experiment with the use and... Read More →
avatar for Cristina Visperas

Cristina Visperas

Ph.D. Candidate in Communication and Science Studies, University of California, San Diego
Cristina Visperas is a PhD candidate in the Communication Department and the Science Studies Program at UC San Diego, and a pre-doctoral fellow with the American Association of University Women. From 2014-2016, she was managing editor of the journal, Catalyst: Feminism, Theory, Technoscience... Read More →
avatar for Erika Barbosa

Erika Barbosa

Ph.D. Student in Visual Art Practice, University of California, San Diego
Erika is a social practice artist and researcher. She works through ethnographic methods to examine constructions of race, gender and class as they shape everyday performances of power in diverse communities. Currently, she is a focused on television's construction and circulation... Read More →
avatar for Joan Donovan

Joan Donovan

Postdoctoral Fellow, UCLA Institute for Society and Genetics
Joan’s research deals with the ways that people incorporate and repurpose everyday technologies to meet social and political ends. Protesters are especially adept at using available technologies to mobilize for social change. Joan’s currently working on projects related to mobile... Read More →
avatar for Kara Wentworth

Kara Wentworth

Postdoctoral Scholar, University of California, San Diego
Kara Wentworth is an interdisciplinary scholar whose work straddles anthropology, science and technology studies, communication and cultural studies.  Building on feminist engagements with science and technology, her work asks questions about the politics of knowledge and difference... Read More →
avatar for Nathalie Reid

Nathalie Reid

Writer, Association of College & Research Libraries' Choice Magazine and Library Journal
Nathalie Reid has an MA in Sociology from Concordia University and an MLIS from McGill University. She has published on the use of social media by non-profit organizations.
avatar for Roshanak Kheshti

Roshanak Kheshti

Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies and Affiliate Faculty in Critical Gender Studies, University of California, San Diego
Roshanak Kheshti is Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies and affiliate faculty in the Critical Gender Studies Program at the University of California, San Diego. She received her PhD in Anthropology with a designated emphasis in Women’s Studies from the University of California... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Klein

Sarah Klein

Ph.D. Candidate in Communication and Science Studies, University of California, San Diego
Sarah Klein works on how methods travel across time and space. Her current research explores how cognitive science experiments are designed, performed, and understood by their researchers and subjects. Her work brings together ethnography, ethnomethodology, and performance-collaboration... Read More →
avatar for Vera Khovanskaya

Vera Khovanskaya

Ph.D. Candidate in Information Science, Cornell University
Vera Khovanskaya is a 3rd year PhD student in Information Science at Cornell university. She studies how values and social implications are built into technology through technical decision-making, and develops methods to identify and alter underlying values in technology. She is currently... Read More →

Curator
avatar for Yelena Gluzman

Yelena Gluzman

Ph.D. Candidate in Communication and Science Studies, University of California, San Diego
Talk to me about documenting performance, about theater as theory, about theory as method, about science as practice, about critical cognitive science, about pedagogy as not-knowing, about Feminist Theory Theater (FTT!).

Thursday October 27, 2016 6:15pm - 7:30pm
iHouse Great Hall
 
Friday, October 28
 

8:00am

Training Feeling: Re-tuning Collective Improvisations, or Self-Help for Ethnographers
How does training affect our improvisations as ethnographers? This workshop will take participants through collective improvisations and reflective exercises that work from and extend experiments in cooperative improvisation of ethnographic moments begun in previous CoLED workshops. By examining moments of affective charge emergent in improvisations, we will explore the legacies of training upon our embodied experiences.

Training encompasses the many ways in which we shape our mind-bodies, from sitting in seminars to taking fitness classes to meditating to learning new customs. Participants will be challenged to think about training as a form of design work. When we engage in training exercises, we are engaging in body-design work geared toward an aspirational mode of being in the world. And yet, given that this design work is always happening in relationship to other, the results can be unpredictable and leak into other areas of our being beyond our original intentions.

Trained embodied practices influence the affective flows in our ethnographic encounters. The workshop will help us to think about how our training--conscious and unconscious, formalized or leaky--may be shaping circuits of feeling and being in ethnography. We will begin with a collective improvisational analysis of an ethnographic moment brought in by participants. After this analysis is completed, we will engage in short writing reflections inspired by the activity led by Alan Klima at the CoLED workshop in Davis. Questions around moment of affective charge in the improvisation and its relationship to past regimes of training will guide the reflection. Finally, participants will perform their improvisation again, this time re-tuned around those moments of feeling and their embodied histories.

Speakers
avatar for Duskin Drum

Duskin Drum

Ph.D. Candidate in Performance Studies, University of California, Davis
duskin drum is an artist, performer, sailor, and woodsman. At UC Davis, he is a PhD candidate in Performance Studies with emphases in performance practice-as-research, Native American Studies, and Science and Technology Studies. Currently, he is writing a dissertation about petroleum... Read More →
avatar for Joe Dumit

Joe Dumit

Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Davis
I study how science and medicine change and how the lives of Americans, including consumers, patients, doctors and scientists also change as the nature of facts and evidence change. My first book, Picturing Personhood: Brains Scans and Biomedical America (Princeton University Press... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Rebolloso McCullough

Sarah Rebolloso McCullough

Associate Director at the Feminist Research Institute, University of California, Davis
Sarah Rebolloso McCullough creates meaningful and respectful dialogue across boundaries that typically divide—between universities and communities, activists and researchers, scientists and humanists, workers and policymakers. Her book manuscript examines how sensations such... Read More →
avatar for Kevin O'Connor

Kevin O'Connor

Ph.D. Candidate in Performance Studies, University of California, Davis
Kevin O’Connor, MFA choreography is a Ph.D candidate in performance studies at UC Davis.  He is  multidisciplinary artist working as a choreographer, dancer, improviser, circus artist and installation artist.  He is involved in a decade long artistic collaboration with Ruth Douthwright... Read More →


Friday October 28, 2016 8:00am - 9:50am
MCC 140 Black Box Studio

9:00am

Keyword Roundtable: Uncommons ←→ Emergence ←→ Singularities
Keyword Panelists
  • Marisol de la Cadena → Uncommons
  • Ton Otto → Emergence
  • Kamala Visweswaran → Singularities

Moderator

Katie Cox

Moderators
avatar for Katie Cox

Katie Cox

Ph.D. Student in Anthropology, University of California, Irvine
Kathryn Cox is a PhD student in Anthropology at UC Irvine. Her doctoral research concerns how notions of gender, risk, and social equity are coproduced through the practices of biomedical research in Mexico. She is a researcher with the Community Knowledge Project at UCI, and is particularly... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Marisol de la Cadena

Marisol de la Cadena

Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Davis
My first book, Indigenous Mestizos. The Politics of Race and Culture in Cuzco, Peru, 1910-1991, was an historical and ethnographic analysis of race relations in the Andes. I made two long standing contributions. a) Since the late nineteenth century a strong tendency has existed... Read More →
avatar for Ton Otto

Ton Otto

Professor of Anthropology at Aarhus University, and Head of the Ethnographic Collections, Moesgaard Museum, University of Aarhus, Denmark
Ton Otto is Head of the Ethnographic Collections at Moesgaard Museum, Aarhus, and a professor of Anthropology at Aarhus University, Denmark, and at James Cook University, Australia. Based on long-term ethnographic field research in Papua New Guinea he has published widely on issues... Read More →
avatar for Kamala Visweswaran

Kamala Visweswaran

Professor of Ethnic Studies, University of California, San Diego
Kamala Visweswaran  received her Ph.D. from  Stanford University in 1990. She writes in the fields of feminist theory and ethnography, South Asian social movements, ethnic and political conflict, human rights, colonial law, postcolonial theory, South Asian literatures,  transnational... Read More →


Friday October 28, 2016 9:00am - 9:50am
iHouse Great Hall

9:00am

EthnoSpa
Join ethngrapher and designer Elizabeth Chin and graduate students for a chance to renew, rejuvenate, and refresh your ethnographic practice! Bring a friend! Relax and pamper yourselves in ways both familiar and strange. Visit the EthnoSpa today!

Speakers
avatar for Stephanie Cedeño

Stephanie Cedeño

MFA Candidate in Media Design Practices, ArtCenter College of Design
Stephanie is a visual and technology designer that tunes into alternative frequencies from political to poetic imaginaries. Drawing from the Formalist literature of Viktor Shklovsky, creative works by novelists (such as Salman Rushdie, Octavio Paz, & Arundhati Roy to name a few... Read More →
avatar for Elizabeth Chin

Elizabeth Chin

Professor of Media Design Practices, ArtCenter College of Design
Elizabeth Chin's work spans a variety of topics–race, consumption, Barbie–but nearly always engages marginalized youth in collaboratively taking on the complexities of the world around them.  I have current projects in Los Angeles, Uganda, and Haiti and have engaged partners... Read More →
avatar for Justine Esquivel

Justine Esquivel

Student, ArtCenter College of Design
Justine has a background in research, business, and multimedia storytelling. She has lived and worked around the world. These experiences ultimately influence her work at MDP as a 3 year Field student with her eyes focused on interactive installation design as an explorative tool... Read More →


Friday October 28, 2016 9:00am - 2:00pm
iHouse Great Hall Side Patio/FirePlace Circle

9:00am

Welcome Table & Packet Pick-up
Pick up a conference packet including a name tag, map, printed schedule, and list of nearby cafes on and off campus, ask questions about the conference schedule, or chat with one of the fabulous CoLED volunteers running the welcome table.

Make sure you register in advance to let us know your dietary and access needs, and get a pre-printed nametag with your name, affiliation, preferred pronouns.

Friday October 28, 2016 9:00am - 4:15pm
iHouse Great Hall Entrance Patio

9:00am

Quiet Room
This room is provided as a quiet, safe space for all conference participants, and as an access accommodation. Please keep lighting low, all sounds off, and sensory distractions to a minimum.

All conference participants are welcome to stop into the quiet room at any time they feel the need for a quiet, peaceful space.

Please respect other conference participants using the space by not working in the quiet room.

Friday October 28, 2016 9:00am - 5:00pm
MCC 133

10:00am

Keyword Roundtable: Keywords ←→ Propose ←→ Disturbances
Keyword Panelists
  • Joan Donovan → Keywords
  • Fernando Domínguez Rubio → Propose
  • Ricardo Dominguez → Disturbances

Moderator

Salvador Zárate

Moderators
avatar for Salvador Zárate

Salvador Zárate

Ph.D. Candidate in Ethnic Studies, University of California, San Diego
Salvador Zárate is a Ph.D. candidate in the department of Ethnic Studies at UC San Diego. Zárate’s work engages the relational racial and gender histories of domestic and gardening labor in Southern California– with an emphasis on the county of Orange. The dissertation draws... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Ricardo Dominquez

Ricardo Dominquez

Electronic Disturbance Theater 2.0/b.a.n.g. lab, Ricardo Dominguez
Ricardo Dominguez is a co-founder of The Electronic Disturbance Theater (EDT), a group who developed virtual sit-in technologies in solidarity with the Zapatistas communities in Chiapas, Mexico, in 1998. His recent Electronic Disturbance Theater 2.0/b.a.n.g. lab project ( http://bang.transreal.org... Read More →
avatar for Joan Donovan

Joan Donovan

Postdoctoral Fellow, UCLA Institute for Society and Genetics
Joan’s research deals with the ways that people incorporate and repurpose everyday technologies to meet social and political ends. Protesters are especially adept at using available technologies to mobilize for social change. Joan’s currently working on projects related to mobile... Read More →
avatar for Fernando Domínguez Rubio

Fernando Domínguez Rubio

Assistant Professor of Communication, University of California, San Diego
Fernando Domínguez Rubio is an Assistant Professor of Communication at the University of California, San Diego. He received his PhD in Sociology from the University of Cambridge in 2008. His research focuses on the study of the different practices, materials, and infrastructures... Read More →


Friday October 28, 2016 10:00am - 10:50am
iHouse Great Hall

10:00am

Experimenting with Money, Objects, and Repertoires
This session is intended to be an interactive workshop that will get the audience thinking about researching monetary instruments as objects of analysis to understand the complex negotiations that people make in their everyday financial lives. Drawing from IMTFI’s Consumer Finance Research Methods Toolkit Project—a collaborative project between ethnographers, applied researchers, and industry practitioners (see provided link below*)— the organizers will introduce ethnographic strategies used by industry practitioners and designers such as mapping financial flows, storyboarding, object-centered interviews and financial diaries to understand the user experience. The group as a whole will then engage in an object-centered exercise of show and tell where participants will reveal “stuff” on their person – 2 things they consider to be “financial” products and 2 that they categorize as “non-financial.” Participants will be asked to attend to the aesthetic, functional, intimate, social and other dimensions of these objects to rank them in order of importance and also divulge one money object they decided to keep private and why. The goal of the session is to highlight the ways that people operate within what we term “monetary ecologies” or assemblages of technologies, objects, property and kinship relations, land, record keeping that together, make up the world of value and exchange in people’s everyday lives. Cataloguing these entities and devices provides the opportunity to identify the relationships and flows among them and grasp what we term “monetary repertoires” or the ways people might use, deploy or manipulate the components of their monetary ecology. The object-centered exercise gets to some of the granularity in these paired concepts of monetary ecologies and repertoires and can be applied by those interested in designing financial products and services that are more suitable and better serve a community’s financial needs. An adaptation of a fieldwork method (object-centered interviews, Toolkit, p. 42) the exercise also introduces participants to a method they can easily adapt and apply to other kinds of design-objects to understand how these participate in broader cultural systems.

*Consumer Finance Research Methods Toolkit: http://www.imtfi.uci.edu/files/consumer_finance_research_methods_project/IMTFI%20Consumer%20Finance%20Research%20Methods%20Toolkit_beta%20version_Reduced%20size.pdf

Speakers
avatar for Ursula Dalinghaus

Ursula Dalinghaus

Postdoctoral Scholar at the Institute for Money, Technology, & Financial Inclusion, University of California, Irvine
I am a cultural anthropologist specializing in economic anthropology and ethnographic approaches to money. My research has examined expert-public communicative encounters with the single European currency, the euro, in Germany, situating new forms of money relations in the lived... Read More →
avatar for Mrinalini Tankha

Mrinalini Tankha

Postdoctoral Scholar at the Institute for Money, Technology, & Financial Inclusion, University of California, Irvine
I am an economic and sociocultural anthropologist currently working as a Postdoctoral Scholar at the Institute for Money, Technology and Financial Inclusion, University of California, Irvine. I am also a Research Fellow for A Sustainable Future for Exuma: Environmental Manageme... Read More →


Friday October 28, 2016 10:00am - 11:50am
SSB 105

10:00am

Devising Scores for Ethnography
This a practical workshop for devising scores for ethnography. This workshop extends experiments from earlier CoLED workshops in bringing methods from devised improvisation of dance, theatre and performance into ethnography. Choreographer J. Burrows describes two main ways of classifying scores: The first kind is something written as a representation of the piece itself, a template which holds within the detail, in linear time, of what you will eventually see or hear. In the second kind of score, what is written or described is a tool for information, image and inspiration. It acts as a source what might happen or what might emerge, but the whose shapes may be different form the final realization.

In this ethnographic workshop we are interested in the second. One of the advantages of the score is a distraction for the performer, providing a focus away from their self-consciousness and fear. Along the way we will discover and discuss how all methods of ethnography come embedded with explicit and implicit instructions. These habitual and disciplined instructions operate like scores limiting the possible engagements with fieldwork. Designing and devising scores for ethnography will provoke innovative fieldwork in training and in practice. We will be inventing and collecting new scores.

Speakers
avatar for Duskin Drum

Duskin Drum

Ph.D. Candidate in Performance Studies, University of California, Davis
duskin drum is an artist, performer, sailor, and woodsman. At UC Davis, he is a PhD candidate in Performance Studies with emphases in performance practice-as-research, Native American Studies, and Science and Technology Studies. Currently, he is writing a dissertation about petroleum... Read More →
avatar for Joe Dumit

Joe Dumit

Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Davis
I study how science and medicine change and how the lives of Americans, including consumers, patients, doctors and scientists also change as the nature of facts and evidence change. My first book, Picturing Personhood: Brains Scans and Biomedical America (Princeton University Press... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Rebolloso McCullough

Sarah Rebolloso McCullough

Associate Director at the Feminist Research Institute, University of California, Davis
Sarah Rebolloso McCullough creates meaningful and respectful dialogue across boundaries that typically divide—between universities and communities, activists and researchers, scientists and humanists, workers and policymakers. Her book manuscript examines how sensations such... Read More →
avatar for Kevin O'Connor

Kevin O'Connor

Ph.D. Candidate in Performance Studies, University of California, Davis
Kevin O’Connor, MFA choreography is a Ph.D candidate in performance studies at UC Davis.  He is  multidisciplinary artist working as a choreographer, dancer, improviser, circus artist and installation artist.  He is involved in a decade long artistic collaboration with Ruth Douthwright... Read More →


Friday October 28, 2016 10:00am - 12:00pm
iHouse Great Hall Side Patio/FirePlace Circle

11:00am

Keyword Roundtable: Materiality ←→ Improvising ←→ Idealism
Keyword Panelists
  • Kim De Wolff → Materiality
  • Joe Dumit → Improvising
  • Christo Sims → Idealism
Moderator
Valerie Black

Moderators
VB

Valerie Black

Ph.D. Student in Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley
Valerie Black is a sociocultural anthropology doctoral student at UC Berkeley working on the intersection of technologically-mediated futurism and mental health monitoring and care provision in the US and Japan. She received an MA in Asian Studies at UC Berkeley.

Speakers
avatar for Joe Dumit

Joe Dumit

Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Davis
I study how science and medicine change and how the lives of Americans, including consumers, patients, doctors and scientists also change as the nature of facts and evidence change. My first book, Picturing Personhood: Brains Scans and Biomedical America (Princeton University Press... Read More →
avatar for Christo Sims

Christo Sims

Assistant Professor of Communication, University of California, San Diego
My research focuses on relations between changing media technologies and the processes by which entrenched social divisions are remade, reconfigured, or overcome in practice. Lately, I have been examining the widespread assumption that the successes of “creative technologists... Read More →
avatar for Kim De Wolff

Kim De Wolff

Postdoctoral Fellow with the Center for the Humanities, University of California, Merced
De Wolff received her Ph.D. in Communication and Science Studies from the University of California, San Diego. Her research interests include the Great Pacific Garbage Patch and oceanic environmental problems with cultures of consumption and waste. During her fellowship, De Wolff... Read More →


Friday October 28, 2016 11:00am - 11:50am
iHouse Great Hall

12:00pm

Lunchtime Lab I: Ethnography & Industry
Limited Capacity filling up

Space is limited. Please follow this link to register in advance:

Advance Sign-Up Here


Please join us for our first Lunchtime Lab for two presentations:

Transitioning from Academia to Industrial Ethnography
(hosted by Sharma Hendel and David Platzer)
In this workshop, geared to current graduate students as well as recently minted phds and post-docs, we will explore the practical and theoretical challenges of transitioning from academic anthropology to work in industrial or design ethnography. The purpose of the workshop is provide an overview of differences between the two modes of ethnographic research as well as to offer practical suggestions for those interested in pursuing careers in industry, design, or “alt-ac” ethnography more broadly. Drawing on David’s experience as an intern with Adobe’s XD Studio design team, as the first “team anthropologist” for an experimental products group (an “internal incubator” in the words of the group’s product manager), as well as Adobe Design’s Senior Experience Research Lead Sharma Hendel’s nearly 20 years in the industry (at both Adobe and Microsoft), the workshop will be comprised of structured and unstructured components. The structured piece (30 minutes) will be lead by Sharma Hendel, and be comprised of a tutorial type overview of “best practices” for successfully transitioning from academic anthropology to ethnographic research roles in organizations like Adobe.

Sharma will address interviewing methods, recruitment, survey screeners, user testing, and the challenges (and fruits) of interfacing with engineers, designers, and product managers, who may or may not recognize the value and purpose of qualitative, ethnographic research. Sharma will also underscore the importance of visual communication and powerpoint presentations (“decks” in corporate parlance) in particular, a medium with conventions and standards quite distinct from the peer-reviewed journal article. Sharma will end by covering the importance of speed (“iteration”) to industrial research and the differences (and overlaps) between the “scientific method” (broadly construed) and the iterative design feedback loop. David will conclude the tutorial by quickly sharing some of his experiences at Adobe and addressing some of the challenges he faced in transitioning from 3+ years of dissertation fieldwork on the autism community to project focused design ethnographic work with XD Studio. In particular, David will address his struggles distilling his ethnographic “data” into the deck format and communicating effectively to designers and managers without recourse to anthropological jargon. The final component of the workshop (15 minutes) will be an unstructured question and answer session which will allow participants the opportunity to ask more specific question about industrial ethnography and, as a group, to continue critically investigating differences between this kind of work and academic inquiry.

Threeing: Incorporating “Relational Circuits” into the Ethnographic Encounter
(hosted by Karl Mendoca and Morgan Russell)
In the field of design research, the ethnographic field visit is no longer a solo, intimate encounter between the researcher and her subject(s). More often than not, it is a choreographed event that involves the participation of a broader milieu of stakeholders and team members that span a gamut of roles and hierarchies. The active participation of “non-ethnographers” in the research process has been both championed and an area of scrutiny and reservation. In the pro-participation camp, we have arguments that emphasize the value of embodied knowledge over synthesized reports. Conversely, we hear about a fair number of risks that need to be mitigated in the form of cautionary tales, where “non-ethnographers” have unwittingly broken basic protocols by speaking over research subjects or hi-jacked an interview.

While adequate preparation with stakeholders is key for both camps, a deeper analysis of the configuration between the “ethnographer,” “research participant” and “non-researcher” is typically of secondary importance to the methodological imperative. In short, there is surprisingly little attention paid to the question of group dynamics, so to speak. Designed for artists, ethnographers, educators and designers, this lecture demonstration will introduce the idea of a “relational circuit” elaborated by video artist and cybernetician Paul Ryan based on semiotician Charles Pierce’s three modes of being (firstness, secondness and thirdness), as one possible theoretical model to address this lacuna. Ryan’s “three person solution” is unique in that it seeks to provide a “non-competitive and asymmetric” approach to collaboration that is fluid, where participants are able to navigate between roles using props and rules. The practice of “threeing” is both engaging and fun, in that the flow of conversation and activity builds towards collectively generated insights that allow for collaboration without conflict.

Moderators
avatar for Shaheen Amirebrahimi

Shaheen Amirebrahimi

Ph.D. Candidate in Anthropology, University of California, Davis
I'm an Anthropology Ph.D. candidate at the University of California Davis - partnered with the Institute for Social Sciences and STS wing - writing up my thesis on the emergence and invention of User Experience in Silicon Valley. I spent three years conducting fieldwork as a UX researcher... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Sharma Hendel

Sharma Hendel

Senior Design Strategist, Lead, Adobe Systems, Inc
After completing a PhD and postdoctoral fellowship in Cognitive Neuropsychology, I promptly left academia in pursuit of an industry job that would incorporate my love of science and psychology while engaging in the fast-paced world of technology. Sixteen years later, I lead an expanding... Read More →
avatar for Karl Mendonca

Karl Mendonca

PhD Student in Film and Digital Media, University of California, Santa Cruz
Karl Mendonca is an experimental filmmaker and new media artist interested in participatory cultures and alternative media networks in South Asia. He has produced work across a variety of media and has shown at diverse venues including the Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, InLight... Read More →
avatar for David Platzer

David Platzer

Ph.D. Candidate in Medical Anthropology, Johns Hopkins University
David is Phd candidate in anthropology at Johns Hopkins University. His dissertation research investigates the application of social design to the field of autism employment. In addition to this research, David has also worked with Adobe’s XD Studio Design unit and The King’s... Read More →
avatar for Morgan Russell

Morgan Russell

Designer, Goodreads - Amazon
Morgan is a designer and researcher at Amazon - Goodreads. Her work as a UX designer and researcher is centered on the foundation of empathy, de-emphasizing the digital and emphasizing the emotional and meaningful. Morgan considers how humor and improv function as valuable roles in... Read More →


Friday October 28, 2016 12:00pm - 1:50pm
MCC 201

12:00pm

Lunch with the International Center Friday Café
Lunch for conference participants will coincide with a weekly campus event in which student groups are invited to present on a global culture.

The Friday Cafe is hosted by the International Center, and will share cuisine and undergraduate student presentation and discussion about a world culture, usually by international students hailing from the region. This week's theme is Kenya. We are glad to share this meal with the Friday Cafe - a long-running tradition on the UCSD campus.

Conference participants, please present the Friday Cafe ticket in your conference packet to receive your lunch. You are invited to stay in the Great Hall and engage with the campus community conversation, or take your lunch outdoors, or to the Lunchtime Lab session.

Menu:
Berbere Spiced Meatballs or Lentil, Kale and Potato stew, Kachumbari (Kenyan cucumber and tomato salad with red onion), Lemon Couscous with Spinach, Coconut Cake

More information about Friday Cafe: http://icenter.ucsd.edu/about/programs-events/icafe.html

Friday October 28, 2016 12:00pm - 2:00pm
iHouse Great Hall

2:00pm

Keyword Roundtable: Data ←→ Labor ←→ New
Keyword Panelists
  • Roderic Crooks → Data
  • Lilly Irani → Labor
  • Wendy Gunn → New

Moderator

Duskin Drum

Moderators
avatar for Duskin Drum

Duskin Drum

Ph.D. Candidate in Performance Studies, University of California, Davis
duskin drum is an artist, performer, sailor, and woodsman. At UC Davis, he is a PhD candidate in Performance Studies with emphases in performance practice-as-research, Native American Studies, and Science and Technology Studies. Currently, he is writing a dissertation about petroleum... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Roderic Crooks

Roderic Crooks

President's Postdoctoral Fellow in the Department of Informatics, University of California, Irvine
Roderic Crooks is a critical scholar of informatics who engages with cultural aspects of technology, primarily through ethnography. His research interests include mobile and smartphone architecture, public education and edtech, and community archives. He also experiments with new... Read More →
avatar for Wendy Gunn

Wendy Gunn

Associate Professor of Design Anthropology, SDU Design, University of Southern Denmark, Visiting Associate Professor RMI
My research inquiry is informed by a problematization of existing notions of sustainability and intervention within design processes and future making practices. Throughout my research in design anthropology (2005-ongoing), I have given focus to the affects that design processes and... Read More →
avatar for Lilly Irani

Lilly Irani

Assistant Professor of Communication, Science Studies, University of California, San Diego
Broadly, my research investigates the cultural politics of high-tech work practices with a focus on how actors produce “innovation” cultures. I work on these questions through two sites: entrepreneurial development efforts in India and the Amazon data processing outsourcing... Read More →


Friday October 28, 2016 2:00pm - 2:50pm
iHouse Great Hall

2:00pm

Searching for #Solidarities: Digital Ethnography
It should come as no surprise that our research requires us to engage participants directly in the places they live, physically and technologically. In this workshop we will explore strategies for conducting fieldwork in the places between the techno-bio-social. Participant observation in virtual worlds can be overwhelming because it requires a complex technological skill set that evolves as our participants adopt new communication technologies into their daily rounds of activities.

As researchers, we must be adept at using these technologies because they are not solely ways of continuing communication across groups between gatherings, but provide spaces for groups to congregate, share thoughts, develop ideas, and archive their histories. We will present concepts of “information mosaics,” “digital cultural capital,” and “platform-agnostic theory” to illustrate how fitting together shards of information and varied forms of social interaction produces both online fieldsites and their representations. Ontology and epistemology are thus in a recursive relationship. For example, constructing an information mosaic about a series of protests across multiple platforms provides a fuller, but never complete, picture of events. Another example: understanding forms of “compulsive creativity” experienced by persons with Parkinson’s disease in Second Life requires attention not just to digial social capital, but digital cultural capital as this appears in both digital objectified states and digital embodied states. We will describe how popular platforms, like Twitter, Facebook, and Youtube, sort content and create networks, while demonstrating ways to query for these places to find the information relevant for your research.

We will also explore how websites and other online phenomena can be read as historical documents, where analyzing past iterations can open new questions, and provide clues on locating interviewees. Lastly, we will discuss the ethics of researching online, where the notion of public/private is no more easily disentangled than in physical-world research.

Speakers
avatar for Tom Boellstorff

Tom Boellstorff

Professor, Department of Anthropology, University of California, Irvine
avatar for Joan Donovan

Joan Donovan

Postdoctoral Fellow, UCLA Institute for Society and Genetics
Joan’s research deals with the ways that people incorporate and repurpose everyday technologies to meet social and political ends. Protesters are especially adept at using available technologies to mobilize for social change. Joan’s currently working on projects related to mobile... Read More →


Friday October 28, 2016 2:00pm - 3:50pm
SSB 105

2:00pm

Sensorship Lab for Field Techniques
Our lab brings together our respective work in digital ethnography and design interventions, which explore surveillance, choreographies of power and the making of a policed state. Our lab is a space for mutual provocations between technologies of surveying and ethnographic ways of seeing. The lab exposes participants to automated investigation techniques employed by the state. These techniques are also used to inform researchers, journalists, and activists seeking to witness events in the digital age. How can ethnographers engage these tools to augment an ethnographic output? How can ethnographers engage these tools to create collaborative outputs with their interlocutors and communities?

We will provide ongoing technology training sessions for ethnographic practitioners interested in getting hands on experience with the tools of surveillance. By focusing on where technology meets surveillance, the lab is a space for thinking through interventions. The lab provides an introduction into forensic and facial recognition techniques while facilitating dialogue around the experiential knowledge that arises from learning and working through these programmatic techniques and languages. The lab encourages participants to envision a creative dismantling of designed power systems: Once you have learned to find faces, you can also obfuscate or swap faces -- providing camouflage, subversion, or protection. Can ethnography inform biometric design to create methods of anti-profiling? How can ethnographic expertise inform critical consciousness and disruption of mass surveillance? Our team: Marcus Guttenplan, a designer with experience working on networked applications for government and experimental research into possible interactions of a hyper networked future, and Erika Barbosa, a visual ethnographer studying the materiality and design of power and oppression through LA county officer ride-alongs, and work with LA-based community organizers.

Meet at the Welcome Table at 2pm, and follow the workshop organizers to the area where they have set up their lab.

Artists
avatar for Erika Barbosa

Erika Barbosa

Ph.D. Student in Visual Art Practice, University of California, San Diego
Erika is a social practice artist and researcher. She works through ethnographic methods to examine constructions of race, gender and class as they shape everyday performances of power in diverse communities. Currently, she is a focused on television's construction and circulation... Read More →
avatar for Marcus Guttenplan

Marcus Guttenplan

Designer, ArtCenter College of Design
Marcus Guttenplan is a designer and developer interested in the user experiences of digital security, and has previously researched and built tools at Area 1 Security and Art Center College of Design.


Friday October 28, 2016 2:00pm - 3:50pm
iHouse Courtyard

3:00pm

Keyword Roundtable: Encounter ←→ Listening ←→ White Supremacy
Keyword Panelists
  • Audra Simpson → Encounter
  • Roshanak Kheshti → Listening
  • Hannah Appel → White Supremacy

Moderator

Amy Kennemore

Moderators
avatar for Amy Kennemore

Amy Kennemore

Ph.D. Candidate in Anthropology, University of California, San Diego
Amy Kennemore received a M.A. in Latin American Studies from the University of North Carolina, Charlotte in 2012. Her Master’s thesis considered the political framework of plurinationalism in Bolivia through an examination of recent tensions between indigenous autonomy and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Hannah Appel

Hannah Appel

Assistant Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Los Angeles
I am an economic anthropologist interested in the daily life of capitalism, the private sector in Africa, and the re-emergent dialogue between economics and anthropology. My research and teaching interests are guided by the economic imagination. How can we expand the field of... Read More →
avatar for Roshanak Kheshti

Roshanak Kheshti

Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies and Affiliate Faculty in Critical Gender Studies, University of California, San Diego
Roshanak Kheshti is Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies and affiliate faculty in the Critical Gender Studies Program at the University of California, San Diego. She received her PhD in Anthropology with a designated emphasis in Women’s Studies from the University of California... Read More →
avatar for Audra Simpson

Audra Simpson

Associate Professor of Anthropology, Columbia University
My primary research is energized by the problem of recognition, by its passage beyond (and below) the aegis of the state into the grounded field of political self-designation, self-description and subjectivity. This work is motivated by the struggle of Kahnawake Mohawks to find... Read More →


Friday October 28, 2016 3:00pm - 3:50pm
iHouse Great Hall

3:00pm

What is an Ethnocharette?

ethnocharrette: a collaborative session of intense activity in which design thinking and methods are used to interrogate and explore ethnographic concerns

From its inception in 2005, one of the core projects of the Center for Ethnography at UC Irvine has been to experiment with how studio settings and design processes might be usefully built into the various phases of ethnographic inquiry, and tailored to its specificities. The staging of para-sites in the pedagogy of dissertation projects has been one such endeavor.

Join Keith Murphy, the co-founder of this pedagogic tool, to learn about the logic behind ethnocharettes, and engage in some hands-on example activities.

Speakers
avatar for Keith Murphy

Keith Murphy

Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Irvine
I’m a linguistic and sociocultural anthropologist, and a fair amount of my work explores the relationship between language, material culture, and human experience. For a long time now I’ve been interested in the social, political, and cultural sides of design and designing... Read More →


Friday October 28, 2016 3:00pm - 4:50pm
MCC 201

5:00pm

Beachwalk
Join other conference attendees for an informal stroll along the scenic La Jolla waterfront. Hosts will provide a prompt for informal discussion related to the conference theme.

Details about where and when to meet, and transportation to/from the hotel and conference venue coming soon!

Friday October 28, 2016 5:00pm - 6:00pm
La Jolla Shores 8300 Camino Del Oro, La Jolla, CA 92037

7:30pm

Ishi: The Archive Performance by James Luna (Pooyukitchchum/Ipai)
Limited Capacity seats available

Ishi: The Archive Performance by James Luna (Pooyukitchchum/Ipai) with Jeneen Frei Njootli (Vuntut Gwitchin) and special guest Tracy Lee Nelson (Luiseno/Diegueno)
Ishi: The Archive Performance is a new work written and performed by renowned Native American visual and performance artist James Luna. In 1911, an Indian man walked into a small northern California town. His appearance inspired fright, laughter, and pity from the populace. Anthropologists came to the conclusion that Ishi was the last of his tribe and decided that for his welfare and for the advancement of science, he would love out his remaining years as a living specimen at the University of California, Berkeley's campus museum. Based on archival work, James Luna has created a powerful exploration of Ishi's life, silence, and the the place that he should hold in the history and cultures of California.

ETHNOGRAPHY & DESIGN: MUTUAL PROVOCATIONS is delighted to list this event, payed for by the California Native American Day committee, and other sources of funding, as part of our conference programming. Because seating is limited, we urge conference goers who plan to attend the performance to RSVP.

Kindly RSVP at CANADaycelebrate@ucsd.edu to reserve your free ticket. 

For more information or upcoming California Native American Day events at UC San Diego, please go to: http://blink.ucsd.edu/go/nativeamerican

For more information about ISHI at UC San Diego, please contact Julie Burelle.

Moderators
avatar for Julie Burelle

Julie Burelle

Assistant Professor in Department of Theatre & Dance, University of California, San Diego
Julie Burelle holds a PhD from the joint program in Drama and Theatre at UC San Diego and UC Irvine. Originally from Quebec, Canada, Julie has studied and taught theatre on both coasts of Canada and of the United States. She earned a B.A. in Theatre from the University of Toronto... Read More →

Artists
avatar for James Luna

James Luna

Visual and Performance Artist
Internationally renowned performance and installation artist James Luna (Puyukitchum/Luiseño) resides on the La Jolla Indian Reservation in North County San Diego,California. With over 30 years of exhibition and performance experience Luna has given voice to Native American cultural... Read More →
avatar for Jeneen Frei Njootli

Jeneen Frei Njootli

Visual and Performance Artist/Founding Member, ReMatriate collective
Jeneen Frei Njootli produces mixed media, audio, performance and installation works in addition to working on community based projects. A member of the Vuntut Gwitchin Nation in northern Yukon, Frei Njootli holds a BFA from Emily Carr University of Art and Design and is working towards... Read More →
avatar for Tracy Lee Nelson

Tracy Lee Nelson

Tribal Chairman, La Jolla Indian Reservation
Tracy Lee Nelson is a Native Californian From the La Jolla Indian Reservation, a descendant of the Guassac, Duro family from the Mesa Grande Indian reservation in San Diego California. (Luiseño/Diegueño tribe.) He emerged from the San Diego and Los Angeles areas as a musician... Read More →



Friday October 28, 2016 7:30pm - 9:00pm
Theodore and Adele Shank Theatre 2910 La Jolla Village Dr, La Jolla, CA 92037
 
Saturday, October 29
 

7:30am

Beachwalk
Join other conference attendees for an informal stroll along the scenic La Jolla waterfront. Hosts will provide a prompt for informal discussion related to the conference theme.

Details about where and when to meet, and transportation to/from the hotel and conference venue coming soon!

Saturday October 29, 2016 7:30am - 9:00am
La Jolla Shores 8300 Camino Del Oro, La Jolla, CA 92037

8:00am

Ethnographic and Theatrical Devising
Limited Capacity seats available

Participation in this workshop is limited. Please follow this link to register in advance:

Advance Sign-Up Here 

Participants in the workshop: please bring a text (short, it can be a word, a sentence, or a paragraph, no more than one page), images, or objects pertaining to your research or area to the workshop.

"I’ve long thought that teaching and learning anthropology should be more fun than they often are. Perhaps we should not merely read and comment on ethnographies, but actually perform them. […] How, then, may this be done?" --Victor Turner, Ritual to Theater, p. 89

Taking up Turner’s invitation, this workshop is an exploration of and a cross pollination between research and narrative practices in theater and anthropology. By creating a dialogue between these disciplines in a laboratory format, we hope to pose questions and engage techniques in ways that will enrich our engagement with anthropological questions and performative productions. We will explore how anthropologists can learn from theater a more playful posture towards research, and a more performative understanding of narrative that can translate into either new forms of writing (essays, plays, short stories, installations, etc.), or into a revitalized existing practice of academic writing. On the other hand, theater makers can learn from anthropology a more nuanced understanding of political and cultural contexts, and how to approach the different discourse formations around events and social issues.

We will engage in exercises that use the body as a tool to explore our ethnographic material, and in the practice of Moment Work to render aspects of the same material performativelly. This theatrical devising technique is a practice for working with non-theatrical source material (interviews, archival documents, medical and legal reports, various media sources, etc.) to construct narratives for the stage.

Greg Pierotti who, as a member of Tectonic Theater Project, is one of the originators of Moment Work, has used this technique in the creation of such plays as “The Laramie Project” and “The People’s Temple." Ugo Edu will lead the embodied exercises at the beginning of the workshop. Cristiana Giordano will lead the part on Moment Work. We hope to reach an audience of social scientists, artists, and experimenters. Ugo Edu is a medical anthropologist, currently developing a full-length theatrical piece based on her dissertation research. This builds on her experience developing theatrical material and performing in a UCB Black Theater Workshop production. She has assisted in data collection and as a capoeira consultant and performer for a theatrical piece about the Freddy Gray murder in Baltimore by Greg Pierotti (Tectonic Theater Project). She has been a collaborator with Brazilian choreographer Isaura Oliveira as dance and capoeira performer since 2014.

Speakers
avatar for Ugo Edu

Ugo Edu

Science, Justice, and Health Equity Post-Doctoral Fellow, Health Equity Institute
Ugo Edu is a medical anthropologist, currently developing a full-length theatrical piece based on her dissertation research. This builds on her experience developing theatrical material and performing in a UCB Black Theater Workshop production. She has assisted in data collection... Read More →
avatar for Cristiana Giordano

Cristiana Giordano

Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Davis
Cristiana Giordano is Associate Professor of Anthropology at UC Davis. She works on foreign migration, mental health, and cultural translation in contemporary Italy. Her research addresses the politics of migration in Europe through the lens of ethno-psychiatry and its radical critique... Read More →
avatar for Greg Pierotti

Greg Pierotti

Research Associate, Tectonic Theater Company/University of California, Davis
Greg Pierotti is an interdisciplinary theater artist. He and his collaborator Cristiana Giordano are currently investigating the intersection of ethnographic and theatrical writing and research practices. Pierotti’s devised theatrical works include, The Laramie Project,  The People’s... Read More →


Saturday October 29, 2016 8:00am - 9:50am
MCC 140 Black Box Studio

8:00am

Experiments in Knowledge Production: Conceptualizing and designing ethnographic research as “healing”
This workshop builds on lessons the workshop organizer has learned through conducting ethnographic research about “healing circles” in a nearby southern California city where working with a Restorative Justice collaborative she examines the intersection of community healing practices and political activism. Playing with concepts developed through ethnographic engagement such as “ healing-ongoing,” as well as with other terms commonly used to describe ethnographic practices such as “process” and “listening,” in this workshop participants are asked to consider: can ethnographic practices of knowledge production be healing for researchers and research participants alike? What might it look like for ethnographers to imagine and design their research practice as well as research products to be healing for their interlocutors, themselves, the planet, and beyond? In medical research such as clinical trials, the hypothesis, and hope, that a given intervention will benefit a research population is often a requirement to justify exposing those populations to drugs and other treatments. In a sense, clinical trials are designed to be explicitly healing. Clinical trials are closed ended, use isolated variables, and work with carefully pre-defined populations.

The design of both healing circles and ethnographic methods are distinct from clinical trials in that they are open ended, self-reflexive, and work with emergent and often changing populations. All of these modalities are experimental and require attention to ethical concerns about both process and outcome. The workshop will include activities in a large group (in a circle) and in small groups and pairs. Reflections will be about ones’ own research and interactions with people/beings/phenomena in the field---thinking about process---as well as the “results” of research and how/if the results of ethnographic research (as diagnosis, as unsettling, as solution, etc.) might be conceptualized as healing. Lastly, the group will reflect upon the limits and potential pitfalls of the concept of “research as healing.”

Speakers
avatar for Connie McGuire

Connie McGuire

Postdoctoral Scholar, University of California, Irvine
Connie McGuire received her PhD in socio-cultural anthropology with the graduate feminist emphasis from UC Irvine, a Masters in Latin American Studies from the University of Texas, Austin and a BA in Sociology from Vassar College. Connie works in the fields of the Anthropology... Read More →


9:00am

Keyword Roundtable: Repatriation ←→ Enchantment ←→ Disagreement
Keyword Panelists
  • Julie Burelle → Repatriation
  • Melissa Caldwell → Enchantment
  • Eli Elinoff → Disagreement

Moderator

Forest Haven

Moderators
avatar for Forest Haven

Forest Haven

Ph.D. Student in Anthropology, University of California, Irvine
Forest Haven is a Ts’msyen from Southeast Alaska with a lifelong interest in traditional subsistence food practices. Her academic foci intersect with settler colonial studies, anthropology of food and the senses, and Alaskan Native studies. She is specifically interested in how... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Julie Burelle

Julie Burelle

Assistant Professor in Department of Theatre & Dance, University of California, San Diego
Julie Burelle holds a PhD from the joint program in Drama and Theatre at UC San Diego and UC Irvine. Originally from Quebec, Canada, Julie has studied and taught theatre on both coasts of Canada and of the United States. She earned a B.A. in Theatre from the University of Toronto... Read More →
avatar for Melissa Caldwell

Melissa Caldwell

Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Santa Cruz
avatar for Eli Elinoff

Eli Elinoff

Lecturer in the School of Social and Cultural Studies, Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand
I am a Lecturer in the Cultural Anthropology Programme at Victoria University of Wellington. My research addresses the interlocking political and environmental questions emerging from Southeast Asia's breakneck urban transition. I am currently working on two ethnographic research... Read More →


Saturday October 29, 2016 9:00am - 9:50am
iHouse Great Hall

9:00am

Welcome Table & Packet Pick-up
Pick up a conference packet including a name tag, map, printed schedule, and list of nearby cafes on and off campus, ask questions about the conference schedule, or chat with one of the fabulous CoLED volunteers running the welcome table.

Make sure you register in advance to let us know your dietary and access needs, and get a pre-printed nametag with your name, affiliation, preferred pronouns.

Saturday October 29, 2016 9:00am - 4:15pm
iHouse Great Hall Entrance Patio

9:00am

Quiet Room
This room is provided as a quiet, safe space for all conference participants, and as an access accommodation. Please keep lighting low, all sounds off, and sensory distractions to a minimum.

All conference participants are welcome to stop into the quiet room at any time they feel the need for a quiet, peaceful space.

Please respect other conference participants using the space by not working in the quiet room.

Saturday October 29, 2016 9:00am - 5:00pm
MCC 133

10:00am

Keyword Roundtable: Participation ←→ Relation ←→ Collaboration
Keyword Panelists
  • Angela Booker →Participation
  •  Michael Montoya → Relation
  • Saiba Varma → Collaboration

Moderator

Kevin O'Connor

Moderators
avatar for Kevin O'Connor

Kevin O'Connor

Ph.D. Candidate in Performance Studies, University of California, Davis
Kevin O’Connor, MFA choreography is a Ph.D candidate in performance studies at UC Davis.  He is  multidisciplinary artist working as a choreographer, dancer, improviser, circus artist and installation artist.  He is involved in a decade long artistic collaboration with Ruth Douthwright... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Angela Booker

Angela Booker

Assistant Professor of Communication, University of California, San Diego
Angela Booker is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Communication currently studying the ways youth, families, and schools make use of media 
and technology for participation, learning and community development. She is particularly concerned with addressing barriers that... Read More →
avatar for Michael Montoya

Michael Montoya

Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Irvine
Michael J. Montoya holds faculty appointments in the departments of Anthropology & Chicano/Latino Studies, in the School of Social Sciences, The Program in Public Health and the Program in Nursing Science in the College of Health Sciences, and is faculty for The Program in Medical... Read More →
avatar for Saiba Varma

Saiba Varma

Assistant Professor, University of California, San Diego
Professor Saiba Varma received her PhD from Cornell University in 2013 and was a postdoctoral fellow in the Thompson Writing Program at Duke University till 2015.  Professor Varma is a medical and cultural anthropologist working on questions of violence, medicine, psychiatry... Read More →


Saturday October 29, 2016 10:00am - 10:50am
iHouse Great Hall

10:00am

Materializing Spatial Dispossession: On the work of the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project
This workshop will begin with a presentation of the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project - a critical cartography, oral history, and digital storytelling collective documenting the dispossession and resistance of San Francisco Bay Area residents in the wake of the Tech Boom (www.antievictionmap.com). Attention will be focused narrative mapping, as I look at the project’s oral history map (http://antievictionmappingproject.net/narratives.html), its call-the-wall mural (https://antievictionmap.squarespace.com/mural-in-clarion-alley), its ethnographic zine, and its interactive video platform. I will go on to describe our methods of collaborative map-making, data gathering, and data interpretation, highlighting how we combine narrative and quantitative data to sharpen analytic connections. This will allow an introduction to contemporary theorizations of feminist data visualization and counter-cartography. This introduction will invoke questions as to what it means to create mapping tools for movement building with (rather than for) communities impacted most by displays of Tech Boom-induced systems of racial capitalism, and how to begin doing so. I will address what it means to create collective digital technologies that both entangle and critique the material impacts of corporate technological interfaces. In describing our methodologies, we will facilitate a conversation with workshop participants around multiple techniques for spatializing displacement and loss, highlighting several visualizing tools and workflows. At the same time, I will lead a discussion about how collaborative design and ethnographic practice can also reframe narratives of dispossession to those of resistance and community power. In doing so, I will discuss our community asset mapping work, and facilitate a community asset mapping exercise amongst workshop participants. Participants will leave the workshop with new understandings of Bay Area gentrification, collective cartographic design practice, feminist data visualization, and narrative framing. There will also be ample time to address technical questions participants might have about data collection and visualization, our technology stack, as well as about ethnographic cartographic design.

Speakers
avatar for Erin McElroy

Erin McElroy

PhD Candidate in Feminist Studies, University of California, Santa Cruz
Erin McElroy is the cofounder/director of the Anti-Eviction Mapping Project - a data visualization, data analysis, and oral history collective documenting the dispossession and resistance of Bay Area residents in the wake of the Tech Boom. She is also a doctoral candidate in Feminist... Read More →


Saturday October 29, 2016 10:00am - 10:50am
SSB 105

11:00am

Keyword Roundtable: Intervention ←→ Healing ←→ Fellow Feeling
Keyword Panelists
  • Peter Redfield → Intervention
  • Connie McGuire → Healing
  • Joseph Hankins → Fellow Feeling

Moderator

Whitney Russell

Moderators
avatar for Whitney Russell

Whitney Russell

PhD Student in Anthropology, University of California, San Diego
Aid, affect, gender, development, South Asia

Speakers
avatar for Joseph Hankins

Joseph Hankins

Associate Professor, University of California, San Diego
Joseph Hankins received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in 2009. His research focuses on the distribution of ethical, affective, and sensory obligation at the intersections of contemporary capitalism and political representation. His book, Working Skin: Making Leather... Read More →
avatar for Connie McGuire

Connie McGuire

Postdoctoral Scholar, University of California, Irvine
Connie McGuire received her PhD in socio-cultural anthropology with the graduate feminist emphasis from UC Irvine, a Masters in Latin American Studies from the University of Texas, Austin and a BA in Sociology from Vassar College. Connie works in the fields of the Anthropology... Read More →
avatar for Peter Redfield

Peter Redfield

Professor of Anthropology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill


Saturday October 29, 2016 11:00am - 11:50am
iHouse Great Hall

11:00am

Ethnolocating: Activating Human Infrastructure in Urban Design
The workshop will begin with an introduction to the idea of staging ethnographic encounters in organizational and activist settings. We will share some of our past interventions and invite others to share their experiences. This will fuel a broader brainstorming process as we concoct other interventions that bring ethnography into the everyday. Depending on the number of participants, this will be done either as a large group or broken up into smaller groups. The workshop will continue with an activity that demonstrates one experimental encounter we have devised. We will invite participants to reflect on their everyday encounter with traffic--a relatively mundane phenomenon--in order to probe more deeply into what factors shape our affective and cultural landscape. We will ask participants to reflect on their own sites of pain and fear in the streets, or in other transportation-related settings. This reflection will help us to create a sense of the affective landscape created through everyday mobility. As desired, we may enact some of these settings with the goal of affective transmission.

Our hope is that through the embodied performance of traffic we might identify sites of connection, re-articulation, and potential re-imagination of these sites of structural violence. We are cognizant of the travails of exploring sites of trauma, even in as banal a setting as daily transportation. For that reason, we endeavor to foster a sense of safety within the workshop space and will consistently check in with participants, offering alternative routes in our exploration. At the conclusion of this exercise, we will invite participants to reflect again upon their initial brainstorms on ethnographic encounters. Now, we will discuss, revisions, additions, caveats, opportunities, and dangers in doing this sort of work.

Speakers
avatar for Adonia E. Lugo

Adonia E. Lugo

Anthropologist, Bicicultures
Adonia E. Lugo is an anthropologist working to build human infrastructure for sustainable transportation. She spent 2013-2015 in Washington, D.C., running an initiative to transform the U.S. bike movement into a space welcoming to women, youth, and people of color and is an editor... Read More →
avatar for Sarah Rebolloso McCullough

Sarah Rebolloso McCullough

Associate Director at the Feminist Research Institute, University of California, Davis
Sarah Rebolloso McCullough creates meaningful and respectful dialogue across boundaries that typically divide—between universities and communities, activists and researchers, scientists and humanists, workers and policymakers. Her book manuscript examines how sensations such... Read More →


Saturday October 29, 2016 11:00am - 11:50am
SSB 105

12:00pm

Lunch
Saturday October 29, 2016 12:00pm - 2:00pm
iHouse Great Hall

12:00pm

Lunchtime Lab II: Ethnographic Games
Limited Capacity seats available

Participation in this workshop is limited. Please follow this link to register in advance:

Advance Sign-Up Here


Ludo-Ethnography: Analog Game Design as an Ethnographic Method
(hosted by Jonathan Walton)
For a group of 4-8 participants (not including ourselves), we’d like to present an in-progress analog game experience that attempts to simulate and perform some of the dynamics and practices present at a particular field site. Together with the participants, we will play through an excerpt of this game and then host a follow-up discussion that debriefs the experience, solicits feedback from the participants based on their own experiences and expertise, and explores the broader possibilities of combining ludographic and ethnographic methods.

Our session examines analog game design as a method for documenting and exploring a particular field site, demonstrating the possibilities and challenges involved in representing a living, dynamic set of interactions in a simulated, malleable experience that is restaged in a different context with different participants. Despite the challenges involved, representing living practices as a game (as different kinds of living practices, essentially) offers many benefits, allowing a more visceral and experiential transmission of findings to others, including students in the classroom, and can also constitute a form of public scholarship aimed at the broader and growing audience for innovative game experiences. And yet many of the same questions still arise in regard to representation, power, and collaboration, just as they would in ethnographic work that takes the form of texts or performances. Jonathan Walton is a PhD student and experimental game designer engaged in ethnographic methods in both areas. Jackson Tegu is an experimental game designer who also consults on, speaks about, and facilitates games internationally.

Terra Incognita (CANCELLED)
(PLEASE CONTACT JAVIER ARBONA FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE TERRA INCOGNITA PROJECT.)
I am proposing to host a session of a game called Terra Incognita. I co-developed Terra Incognita with art collective Demilit, originally for the Istanbul Design Biennial in 2012 and since then played in different venues. In Terra Incognita, participants co-create an infinite geographical puzzle. In this game, we enter our routine world in a way that makes the familiar uncommon and reveals it anew. Every new puzzle piece of Terra Incognita can be the seed of a new puzzle, or be added or overlaid onto an ever-expanding one. Terra Incognita is played to decipher and re-cipher a place by activating the senses and memory. In Terra Incognita, players map a collective incompleteness—a group hallucination of an imagined terrain. By building and interacting with the puzzle, players identify conflicts and fissures in the spatial politics of their immediate places, explore unknown neighborhoods, play entertaining games, solve evolving mysteries, and fantasize about hidden geographies. Terra Incognita can be an activist weapon, an art piece, and a discussion catalyst all in one. At UCSD, of course, this could be done on campus or near campus, but participants can also carry it forward elsewhere later. I will provide the starting instructions, materials, and facilitation, while also host conversation for players to develop techniques of puzzle-making, and play games with their collected puzzle pieces. Players can even invent new games and share the rules with others, potentially by adding documentation to the web. (Suggested tag: #TerraIncognita).

Speakers
avatar for Javier Arbona

Javier Arbona

Assistant Professor of American Studies and Design, University of California, Davis
I hold a dual appointment at the University of California, Davis, as an Assistant Professor in the American Studies and Design departments. In addition, I am part of the affiliate faculty for the Cultural Studies Graduate Group and the Geography Graduate Group. My double life... Read More →
avatar for Jonathan Walton

Jonathan Walton

Ph.D. Student in Communication, University of California, San Diego


12:30pm

Lunchtime Lab III: Experiments in Teaching Ethnographic Methods
Limited Capacity filling up

Participation in this workshop is limited. Please follow this link to register in advance:

Advance Sign-Up Here


Experiments in Teaching Ethnographic Methods


Elana Zilberg and Christina Aushana host a lunchtime discussion and syllabus sharing event.

This lunchtime roundtable and discussion will bring faculty and graduate students together to discuss the state of ethnographic methods pedagogy for graduate and undergraduate students at their campuses and the different models and experimental approaches. Participating panelists will be asked to share specific examples of exercises they have included in their syllabi.

Moderators
avatar for Christina Aushana

Christina Aushana

Ph.D. Student in Communication, University of California, San Diego
Christina is a doctoral student in the Department of Communication at the University of California, San Diego. Her dissertation examines police training facilities and patrol work as sites of performative practices, tracing these engagements with performance from policing to incarceration... Read More →
avatar for Elana Zilberg

Elana Zilberg

Associate Professor of Communication, University of California, San Diego
My earlier work focused on security, space, and mobility between the United States and Latin America. In my book Space of Detention: The Making of a Transnational Gang Crisis between Los Angeles and San Salvador (Duke University Fall 2011), I tracked the production of transnational... Read More →

Saturday October 29, 2016 12:30pm - 1:30pm
MCC 201

1:00pm

Exploring Concepts of Care and Vulnerability in the Co-Design of Health Interventions
The session will commence with workshop leaders presenting a brief account of our experiences in the co-design of a visual narrative intervention to support knowledge sharing of family mental wellness concerns, and strategies for addressing them among East African refugee and immigrant community members in a nonclinical setting. Next, each of the leaders will frame a question for the group to consider in relation to cultural vulnerability and critical community-based care practices, and will engage the participants in sharing relevant ideas and experiences through a performance-based activities we have used in our project.
From its inception our case study project has been conceived in close collaboration among the interdisciplinary team at UCSD and United Women of East Africa, the leading community organization dedicated to culturally competent health services, education, and advocacy for East African women and families in San Diego.

Our team has co-designed graphic-novel style stories of refugee/immigrant family experiences that we will embed in an mHealth tool for facilitating peer to peer groups in community settings. Co-design of the tools employed situates affected community as expert partners in dialogue with biomedical practitioners, health communication specialists, and active promoters of “community mental health competence” (Campell & Burgess, 2012). This work is guided by the assertions that progress toward health equity and full social inclusion must be founded upon equitable and deeply interactive design, structure and governance of community-based research processes (Ellis et al., 2007; Miller, 2004).

Speakers
avatar for Sahra Abdi

Sahra Abdi

Executive Director, United Women of East Africa
Sahra Abdi is a community activist and a respected advocate for refugees from Somalia in San Diego. She is founding executive director of United Women of East Africa Support Team (UWEAST). Since 2008, UWEAST has worked to improve culturally competent health services and education... Read More →
avatar for Lauren Berliner

Lauren Berliner

Assistant Professor of Media and Communication Studies and Cultural Studies, University of Washington Bothell
Lauren S. Berliner is an Assistant Professor of Media and Communication Studies and Cultural Studies at University of Washington Bothell, where she teaches courses on media praxis and participatory media culture. Her research engages ongoing transformations in everyday and amateur... Read More →
avatar for Sol D'Urso

Sol D'Urso

Ph.D. Student in Anthropology, University of California, San Diego
Sol D’Urso is a licensed mental health clinician and Adjunct Faculty at University of San Diego, Marriage and Family therapy master program. Sol has 11 years of experience as a mental health clinician working with survivor or torture, immigrants and their families in San Diego and... Read More →
avatar for Bethlehem Degu

Bethlehem Degu

Program Manager, United Women of East Africa
Bethlehem Degu was born in Ethiopia and has lived in San Diego for over 20 years. She is a Program Manager at United Women of East Africa Support Team. Bethlehem is currently pursuing her Master’s in Public Health at San Diego State University.
avatar for Brian Goldfarb

Brian Goldfarb

Associate Professor of Communication, University of California, San Diego
Brian Goldfarb is Associate Professor of Communication at the University of California, San Diego. His research and creative production focus on visual/digital culture, disability and education. His book, Visual Pedagogy, considers media technologies used advance models of pedagogy... Read More →
avatar for Jama Mohamed

Jama Mohamed

Program Coordinator, United Women of East Africa
Jama Mohamed, Program Coordinator-Making Connections Initiative, is a refugee from Somalia and has lived in San Diego since 1996. Jama has been engaging young men in community leadership projects since 2008, first as a youth leader with MAAC Project and later as a student counselor... Read More →
avatar for Riley Taitingfong

Riley Taitingfong

PhD Student in Communication, University of California, San Diego
Riley Taitingfong is a third year PhD student in Communication at UCSD. Her work is centered primarily around minority health and health technologies. In particular she is interested in working collaboratively with indigenous communities to coproduce new health-related media and technologies... Read More →


Saturday October 29, 2016 1:00pm - 3:00pm
SSB 105

2:00pm

Keyword Roundtable: Prosthetic ←→ Body ←→ Cyborg
Keyword Panelists
  • S. Lochlann Jain → Prosthetic
  • Karen Nakamura → Body
  • Cassandra Hartblay → Cyborg
Moderator
Heather Thomas

Moderators
avatar for Heather Thomas

Heather Thomas

Ph.D. Candidate in Anthropology, University of California, Irvine
I am a PhD Candidate in Anthropology at UC Irvine. My research explores the formation and maintenance of autistic communities and networks online and offline.

Speakers
avatar for Cassandra Hartblay

Cassandra Hartblay

Postdoctoral Scholar with the Collaboratory for Ethnographic Design (CoLED), University of California, San Diego
Cassandra Hartblay is a cultural and medical anthropologist, social theorist, and multimedia storyteller. Her work focuses on Russia and the Russian-speaking former Soviet Union. Dr. Hartblay's approach to theory is informed by global justice movements and medical anthropology especially... Read More →
avatar for S. Lochlann Jain

S. Lochlann Jain

Associate Professor of Anthropology, Stanford University
Professor Jain's research is primarily concerned with the ways in which stories get told about injuries, from car crashes to lung cancer, from mountain climbing deaths to space shuttle explosions. Figuring out the political and social significance of these stories has led her to... Read More →
avatar for Karen Nakamura

Karen Nakamura

Robert and Colleen Haas Distinguished Chair of Disability Studies and Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley
Karen Nakamura is a cultural and visual anthropologist whose research focuses on disability, sexuality, and minority social movements in contemporary Japan. Her first book, Deaf in Japan, was on sign language, identity, and deaf social movements. She recently finished a second... Read More →


Saturday October 29, 2016 2:00pm - 2:50pm
iHouse Great Hall

2:00pm

Cabinet for Political Fictions
This session aims to explore and test new forms of creating controversies and intellectual debate outside established academic formats. Departing from the usual presentation of papers, the session proposes a discussion organized around a political fiction in which the executive committee of an unnamed country is summoned to solve an impending crisis. The fiction will be enacted by the members of the executive committee (represented by the organizers of this session); the audience (who will play an active role as the staff of the executive committee); and a series of guest experts (who will be called in to provide guidance to the executive committee and its staff).

Speakers
avatar for Marisol de la Cadena

Marisol de la Cadena

Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Davis
My first book, Indigenous Mestizos. The Politics of Race and Culture in Cuzco, Peru, 1910-1991, was an historical and ethnographic analysis of race relations in the Andes. I made two long standing contributions. a) Since the late nineteenth century a strong tendency has existed... Read More →
avatar for Fernando Domínguez Rubio

Fernando Domínguez Rubio

Assistant Professor of Communication, University of California, San Diego
Fernando Domínguez Rubio is an Assistant Professor of Communication at the University of California, San Diego. He received his PhD in Sociology from the University of Cambridge in 2008. His research focuses on the study of the different practices, materials, and infrastructures... Read More →


3:00pm

Keyword Roundtable: Dramaturgy ←→ Theater ←→ Aesthetics
Keyword Panelists
  • Cristiana Giordano & Greg Pierotti → Dramaturgy
  • Yelena Gluzman → Theater
  • Sasha Welland → Aesthetics

Moderator

Yelena Gluzman

Speakers
avatar for Cristiana Giordano

Cristiana Giordano

Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of California, Davis
Cristiana Giordano is Associate Professor of Anthropology at UC Davis. She works on foreign migration, mental health, and cultural translation in contemporary Italy. Her research addresses the politics of migration in Europe through the lens of ethno-psychiatry and its radical critique... Read More →
avatar for Yelena Gluzman

Yelena Gluzman

Ph.D. Candidate in Communication and Science Studies, University of California, San Diego
Talk to me about documenting performance, about theater as theory, about theory as method, about science as practice, about critical cognitive science, about pedagogy as not-knowing, about Feminist Theory Theater (FTT!).
avatar for Greg Pierotti

Greg Pierotti

Research Associate, Tectonic Theater Company/University of California, Davis
Greg Pierotti is an interdisciplinary theater artist. He and his collaborator Cristiana Giordano are currently investigating the intersection of ethnographic and theatrical writing and research practices. Pierotti’s devised theatrical works include, The Laramie Project,  The People’s... Read More →
avatar for Sasha Welland

Sasha Welland

Associate Professor in Anthropology and Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies, University of Washington
Sasha Welland is Associate Professor in Anthropology and Gender, Women & Sexuality Studies, and an affiliated faculty member in China Studies and Comparative History of Ideas and of the graduate certificate programs in Cinema & Media Studies and Public Scholarship. Her first boo... Read More →


Saturday October 29, 2016 3:00pm - 3:50pm
iHouse Great Hall

3:00pm

Sensory Ethnography Writing Lab
"Writing offers the chance to cultivate an attentiveness to life itself, and to enhance perceptions with the precision of words,” writes Kirin Narayan, a cultural anthropologist and writer whose work straddles the line between ethnography and creative nonfiction. This workshop takes Narayan’s book “Alive in Writing: Crafting Ethnography in the Company of Chekhov” as a source and inspiration. How can we write sensation? How can we write in descriptive and evocative ways to bring the matters driving our projects to life on the page? Using free writing and prompts, the organizers will set our writing processes and collaborative work in motion. We ask participants to bring quotes, images, or ideas for prompts with them as well. Together, we will develop a toolbox of sensory ethnographic writing prompts and exercises that we can all take with us.

Speakers
avatar for Christina Aushana

Christina Aushana

Ph.D. Student in Communication, University of California, San Diego
Christina is a doctoral student in the Department of Communication at the University of California, San Diego. Her dissertation examines police training facilities and patrol work as sites of performative practices, tracing these engagements with performance from policing to incarceration... Read More →
avatar for Katrin Pesch

Katrin Pesch

Independent Filmmaker and Scholar
I’m an artist, filmmaker, and writer. In June 2016, I received my PhD in Art History, Theory, and Criticism with a Concentration in Art Practice from the University of California, San Diego. My research draws on diverse fields such as film studies, postcolonial studies, material... Read More →
avatar for Kara Wentworth

Kara Wentworth

Postdoctoral Scholar, University of California, San Diego
Kara Wentworth is an interdisciplinary scholar whose work straddles anthropology, science and technology studies, communication and cultural studies.  Building on feminist engagements with science and technology, her work asks questions about the politics of knowledge and difference... Read More →


Saturday October 29, 2016 3:00pm - 4:45pm
SSB 105

4:00pm

Keyword Roundtable: Drafts ←→ Success ←→ Politics
Keyword Panelists
  • Alberto Corsín Jiménez → Drafts
  • Shalini Shankar → Success
  • Nancy Postero → Politics

Moderator

Christian Doll

Moderators
avatar for Christian Doll

Christian Doll

Ph.D. Candidate in Anthropology, University of California, Davis
My research analyzes state-making and futurity in South Sudan by looking at official projects and everyday activities in South Sudan's capital city, Juba. I have conducted fieldwork in South Sudan since 2012 and am currently writing my dissertation. I experiment with the use and... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Alberto Corsín Jiménez

Alberto Corsín Jiménez

Associate Professor in Social Anthropology, Dept. History of Science, Spanish National Research Council
I am Reader in Social Anthropology in the Department of the History of Science at the Spanish National Research Council in Madrid. My main areas of research and writing are: the anthropology of the city, in particular the ethnography of informal, guerrilla and frontier urbanism... Read More →
avatar for Nancy Postero

Nancy Postero

Associate Professor of Anthropology, University of California, San Diego
Nancy Postero received her PhD in Anthropology from UC Berkeley in 2001, and is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of California San Diego.  She works at the intersection of politics, race, and political economy. She is the author of Now We Are Citizens: Indigenous... Read More →
avatar for Shalini Shankar

Shalini Shankar

Professor of Anthropology, Northwestern University
Shalini Shankar is a sociocultural and linguistic anthropologist has conducted qualitative research with South Asian American youth and communities in Silicon Valley, with advertising agencies in New York, San Francisco, and Los Angeles, and with spelling bee participants and... Read More →


Saturday October 29, 2016 4:00pm - 4:50pm
iHouse Great Hall

4:00pm

Engaging with the Productive Dilemmas of Collaborative Research: Spotify as a Platform of Intercultural Dialogue
The rise in cultural politics in Latin America and other parts of the world over the past few decades has generated productive debates over the politics of knowledge and representation, also highlighting many of the practical and ethical dilemmas of ethnographically engaging in, and writing about identity-based rights claims. Such dilemmas may also generate new conditions of possibility for politically engaged collaborative research: They offer an entry point for an ethnographic method that emphasizes modes of connection (Hankins 2014; Povinelli 2011); the potential of theoretical analyzes based on mutual dialogue and shared political commitment (Rappaport 2005; Speed 2006); and the “excess meaning” of history and practices that are often lost in translation across social difference (de la Cadena 2015). Rather than seeking to elide or overcome the dilemmas of collaborative research, such approaches ask us to be attuned to the difficult labor of embracing them. But they also raise new pedagogical challenges in designing and teaching ethnographic method. This workshop will explore such challenges by asking participants to collaboratively design research and pedagogical tools based on musical exchange.

This workshop will be carried out in two phases: In phase one, participants, working in groups of 4-5 members, will first individually select two songs from Spotify (one from a genre that best represents their “social type” and a second that best represents their personal taste, motivations, and desires), and then be asked to share their selections with the group. They will finish the session by collaboratively searching for and negotiating to select a genre/song that best represents their collective tastes and interests. Phase two will involve a discussion among all participants of the tensions that emerged in phase one, who will be asked to take such tensions as a point of reflection to consider how platforms such as Spotify might offer a critical analytical tool for both the field site and the classroom. The overall aim of the workshop is to experiment with different techniques that can provoke “affective and energetic” (Povinelli 2011) reflections that can be critically attuned to the productive dilemmas of politically committed collaborative research.

If possible, please bring a laptop with Spotify downloaded.

Speakers
avatar for Amy Kennemore

Amy Kennemore

Ph.D. Candidate in Anthropology, University of California, San Diego
Amy Kennemore received a M.A. in Latin American Studies from the University of North Carolina, Charlotte in 2012. Her Master’s thesis considered the political framework of plurinationalism in Bolivia through an examination of recent tensions between indigenous autonomy and... Read More →


Saturday October 29, 2016 4:00pm - 5:00pm
MCC 201

5:00pm

Plenary Closing: Making ←→ Experimental Systems ←→ Interface
Moderators
avatar for Christina Aushana

Christina Aushana

Ph.D. Student in Communication, University of California, San Diego
Christina is a doctoral student in the Department of Communication at the University of California, San Diego. Her dissertation examines police training facilities and patrol work as sites of performative practices, tracing these engagements with performance from policing to incarceration... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Elizabeth Chin

Elizabeth Chin

Professor of Media Design Practices, ArtCenter College of Design
Elizabeth Chin's work spans a variety of topics–race, consumption, Barbie–but nearly always engages marginalized youth in collaboratively taking on the complexities of the world around them.  I have current projects in Los Angeles, Uganda, and Haiti and have engaged partners... Read More →
avatar for Kim Fortun

Kim Fortun

Professor in Department of Science and Technology Studies, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute
Trained as a cultural anthropologist, Kim Fortun’s research and teaching focus on environmental problems, and on ways ethnographic and experimental methods can be used to address the complexities of the contemporary world.  Her research has examined how people in different... Read More →
avatar for Ilya Utekhin

Ilya Utekhin

Professor of Anthropology, European University at St. Petersburg
Ilya Utekhin, PhD (Anthropology), is professor of Department of Anthropology, European University at St.Petersburg; he was Нead of Department between 2002 and 2008, and holds this position from 2015. He leads EUSP Multimedia Initiatives Unit and is in charge of MOOCs production in... Read More →


Saturday October 29, 2016 5:00pm - 5:50pm
iHouse Great Hall
 
Sunday, October 30
 

8:00am

Beachwalk
Join other conference attendees for an informal stroll along the scenic La Jolla waterfront. Katie Cox will provide a prompt for informal discussion related to the conference theme.

Details about where and when to meet, and transportation to/from the hotel and conference venue coming soon!

Speakers
avatar for Katie Cox

Katie Cox

Ph.D. Student in Anthropology, University of California, Irvine
Kathryn Cox is a PhD student in Anthropology at UC Irvine. Her doctoral research concerns how notions of gender, risk, and social equity are coproduced through the practices of biomedical research in Mexico. She is a researcher with the Community Knowledge Project at UCI, and is particularly... Read More →


Sunday October 30, 2016 8:00am - 10:00am
Torrey Pines Gliderport Torrey Pines Gliderport, 2800 Torrey Pines Scenic Drive, La Jolla, CA 92037